Impress Your CTO (2)

People expect software to “just work”. You can guarantee that it won’t
“just work” when someone decides to throw more data at than you expected. So my 2nd tip is:

Enforce Sane Limits

From a developer point of view it makes sense to think in terms of 1 to Many or Many to 1. Why put in extra work to enforce some limitation when you can have unlimited flexibility for free?

Because the real world doesn’t work that way and it’s more important to model the real world than it is to create infinite flexibility. Some good reasons:

  1. Usability
  2. Performance
  3. Commercial reasons

Usability

The more “many’s” in your one to many, the more UI real estate you need to think about. Pagination, sorting, searching, exporting lists to Excel. Maybe favouriting so that people can shortlist the results because they can’t make sense of the whole list. Nothing here is super-complicated to code, but given that the scarce resource in most tech operations is developer time, as a great developer you will be ensuring that you are spending your valuable time on the most value-add activities.

Performance

Be honest. You aren’t about to write comprehensive automated performance tests. If you allow people to add unlimited items then eventually someone will do so and, probably sooner than you expect, you will experience serious performance issues. Which then means that you need to be spending valuable developer time addressing those performance issues because by the time you have enough traction to have performance issues you aren’t going to be able to withdraw the poorly performing feature [*].

Commercial Reasons

Maybe a surprise to see this as a reason but it may be the one you would do best to remember. The simple point here is that if the standard version of your product allows the user to add up to 15 items to a Thingamy then not only do you lower the risk of performance issues etc but you have a built-in mechanism that your product managers can use to upsell your customers to the next subscription level: “You want to handle more than 15 items? Let me put you through to our Enterprise Sales team”. If there is demand for the feature and customers will pay for it then fantastic – it will be a great feature to spend some real effort and attention to and give it a stunning user experience that performs really well.

Conclusion

I’m not saying to do anything complicated in your database. Leave the database handling a 1 to Many relationship. Just put check somewhere in your business logic. Next time you are discussing a feature with your product owner and you are thinking about the many side of the object model, just ask the question: “Would 5 be enough?”

[*] This is a case of “do as I say, not as I do” here. In my own side project which allows a user to merge and stitch together data from different Excel files I didn’t impose any limits. I asked some friends and family to test it and the second thing my brother did was try to crash it. It worked. So now I’ve implemented some limit checking.

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